seanaes

things and stuff

October 1, 2013 at 10:27am
4 notes
Reblogged from betaknowledge

Foursquare Data Viz Shows The Pulse Of New York, London, Tokyo →

September 4, 2013 at 5:05pm
131 notes
Reblogged from megazal
megazal:

Antenna (via m-louis)

megazal:

Antenna (via m-louis)

(via architectureofdoom)

5:05pm
122 notes
Reblogged from amaki09
amaki09:

Tracking (by Albion68)

amaki09:

Tracking (by Albion68)

(via inessentialgrace)

July 15, 2013 at 6:42pm
2,273 notes
Reblogged from cayce
cayce:

The most perfect place on earth.

cayce:

The most perfect place on earth.

(via cabinology)

July 10, 2013 at 1:19pm
188,585 notes
Reblogged from meme4u

(via windowshighasfuck)

July 3, 2013 at 8:21pm
67 notes
Reblogged from lieutenantcobretti

(Source: lieutenantcobretti, via 2087)

8:12pm
1,719 notes
Reblogged from likeafieldmouse

likeafieldmouse:

Katsumi Hayakawa (2010-12) - Paper on paper

1. Composition 1 

2. Composition 17 

3, Construction No. 2M 

8:11pm
557 notes
Reblogged from ummhello

ummhello:

UN City, 3XN

June 28, 2013 at 6:09pm
553 notes
Reblogged from new-aesthetic
new-aesthetic:

McDonalds app (via Twitter / hrtbps)

new-aesthetic:

McDonalds app (via Twitter / hrtbps)

May 27, 2013 at 8:22pm
4,581 notes
Reblogged from nevver

nevver:

Journey to the Center of the Earth

May 23, 2013 at 11:12am
32 notes
Reblogged from whileatsea
whileatsea:

(from the Architecture collection)by Lauren Krieger

whileatsea:

(from the Architecture collection)
by Lauren Krieger

11:09am
1,671 notes
Reblogged from amjayes

May 21, 2013 at 6:56pm
9,969 notes
Reblogged from togifs

spytap:

pberntsen:

cheatsheet:

Is it summer yet? 

Whhhhhhhhaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat thheeeeeeee fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuck

This.

Changes.

EVERYTHING!

(Source: togifs, via garychou)

April 10, 2013 at 1:17pm
33 notes
Reblogged from courtneyetc
courtneyetc:

Originally a Graphic Designer by education, after finishing undergrad, I transitioned into interface design because of my love for technology. I want to write about this transition and my process, because I hope it will be helpful to designers interested in mobile.
Today, Foursquare 6.0 went live for iOS, and I’m thankful to have been a part of it. I’ll start with writing about this project because it’s closest at hand, but I’ve set myself a goal to write more this year.
During last summer’s Foursquare 5.0 project, I started committing assets to our iOS repository in Git. This time, I committed my first line of code to Foursquare.
I know the filenames of our assets, but I don’t know my way around our Xcode project or UIKit. To tweak a part of the app, I grep for an asset’s filename. For instance, I wanted to add a custom pressed state to the check in button. Grep-ing for the check in button filename, I found the source code for the button. I looked at the documentation for UIButton and found that it has a method called setImage:forState:. Easy. Previewed it in the simulator, and pushed the Go button when I was happy with the effect. Using the same method, I tweaked typography.
One of my favorite parts of this project didn’t require any coding on my part. Foursquare’s brand is playful when appropriate, and we like to hide Easter eggs. Working with an iOS engineer, Brian, we added a hidden pull-to-refresh graphic. First, I gave Brian a blank, placeholder image so he could functionally complete the pull-to-refresh. As I worked on the illustration with a designer teammate, I continued to commit (and overwrite) the same image until it was done. I make many changes to our app like this.
This release took just over a month, with four dedicated iOS engineers (plus one more, who joined Team Foursquare during the last few weeks of the project).
Special shout out to our newest member of the design team, Mark, who made a tremendous impact on this release. You can see his handiwork on the new Sign Up screen, among many more places.

courtneyetc:

Originally a Graphic Designer by education, after finishing undergrad, I transitioned into interface design because of my love for technology. I want to write about this transition and my process, because I hope it will be helpful to designers interested in mobile.

Today, Foursquare 6.0 went live for iOS, and I’m thankful to have been a part of it. I’ll start with writing about this project because it’s closest at hand, but I’ve set myself a goal to write more this year.

During last summer’s Foursquare 5.0 project, I started committing assets to our iOS repository in Git. This time, I committed my first line of code to Foursquare.

I know the filenames of our assets, but I don’t know my way around our Xcode project or UIKit. To tweak a part of the app, I grep for an asset’s filename. For instance, I wanted to add a custom pressed state to the check in button. Grep-ing for the check in button filename, I found the source code for the button. I looked at the documentation for UIButton and found that it has a method called setImage:forState:. Easy. Previewed it in the simulator, and pushed the Go button when I was happy with the effect. Using the same method, I tweaked typography.

One of my favorite parts of this project didn’t require any coding on my part. Foursquare’s brand is playful when appropriate, and we like to hide Easter eggs. Working with an iOS engineer, Brian, we added a hidden pull-to-refresh graphic. First, I gave Brian a blank, placeholder image so he could functionally complete the pull-to-refresh. As I worked on the illustration with a designer teammate, I continued to commit (and overwrite) the same image until it was done. I make many changes to our app like this.

This release took just over a month, with four dedicated iOS engineers (plus one more, who joined Team Foursquare during the last few weeks of the project).

Special shout out to our newest member of the design team, Mark, who made a tremendous impact on this release. You can see his handiwork on the new Sign Up screen, among many more places.

January 3, 2013 at 5:32pm
575 notes
Reblogged from valentineuhovski
valentineuhovski:



Andreas Gursky, Rimini, (2003).  Photo via Phillips de Pury & Company. 

valentineuhovski:

Andreas Gursky, Rimini, (2003).  Photo via Phillips de Pury & Company. 

(via architectureofdoom)